war

RIP: Dmitry Chebotayev

Russian photojournalist Dmitry Chebotayev was killed on May 7, 2007 when a roadside bomb struck the U.S. military vehicle in which he was traveling. Chebotayev was on assignment for Newsweek, reporting on American military operations in the Diyala province. Chebotayev was the first Russian journalist to be killed in Iraq since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion there. Six American soldiers in the vehicle were also killed.Russian photojournalist Dmitry Chebotayev was killed on May 7, 2007 when a roadside bomb struck the U.S. military vehicle in which he was traveling. Chebotayev was on assignment for Newsweek, reporting on American military operations in the Diyala province. Chebotayev was the first Russian journalist to be killed in Iraq since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion there. Six American soldiers in the vehicle were also killed. Further details of the killing can be found here.
Chebotayev's work can be viewed here and here.

Chebotayev's friend,  Sergey Ponomarev, is organizing a website and book project to showcase Chebotayev's work. Those interested in donating time or money, or anyone who could help with fundraising from foundations, should contact him at ponomarevs@gmail.com.

WarShooter contributor Bill Putnam has also passed along this tribute written by Bob and Marine Black:
Птица известна ее полетом.....
we begin and end in dream but through the course of our waking we are not dream but flesh and bone and blood, weighted down by life’s gravity and time’s urgency, born into and back by the way in which we carry our lives and our actions. Though we cannot, not ever, know this life and this world, it, sometimes majestically and sometimes horribly, knows us all too well. How to measure this unfathomable inequality?: to, without certainty and assuredness, without footing and buckles, to extract from the life what it has given up and to share that experience with others. To sing the dark with rhyming and light. Dima’s life and work are a testament to this. His brave and unyielding work in Urkraine and in Chetnya are ballasts by which we can measure our own understanding of place and people’s whose lives have been rendered harshly. My wife, just last week, spoke of the honesty and “beauty” (in the humanistic sense) of his work and that it was clear that his compass pointed toward the undestanding, the noble witnessing of that life and for those who had lived through those difficult times and places. Dima’s work and his character as a person are rhymes by which, all of us can take inside ourselves, swallow them inside our cold and wearied bodies and allow them to sing inside the place of darkness into which we all so often feel trapped.
That he shall remain among his friends and family, not in the relm of dreams but in the life surrounding. Like all sources of light, Dima and his work shall not pass beneath this temporary cloak of darkness and will be folded back and will emerge corona-spark and unyielding.
The deepest and most personal condolences for Dima’s family, friends and loved ones from our family…..
мы – с Вами.......

spose e macerie (war & wedding)

Spose e Macerie (War & Wedding)

BEIRUT, settembre 2006 Quartiere di Haret Hreik, "roccaforte" sciita. La vita prosegue.  Difficile anche solo respirarla quell'aria...piena di polveri strane, di cemento sbriciolato e chissà di quali sostanze chimiche... difficile camminare nel cemento fuso dal fosforo bianco, tra le donne che osservano silenziose le ruspe che tiran su i brandelli delle loro case...  e poi un vestito da sposa...uno dei pochi negozi con le serrande su, e il piu bel vestito esposto...a dimostrare che non ci si ferma.. a dimostrare che la vita vince sempre.  MORTE ALLE VOSTRE BOMBE! Baruda © All rights reserved.

Human Rights Watch: Children in the Ranks

Childrenintheranks Use this link to run the video: Children in the Ranks - US: Cut Military Aid to Governments Using Child Soldiers An estimated 250,000 children, some as young as eight years old, are serving in armed conflict. Children serve as spies, messengers, porters, and too often, as front-line combatants. Many female child soldiers are forced to serve as sex slaves to military commanders. Human Rights Watch is a leading voice against the use of child soldiers worldwide. Human Rights Watch co-founded the International Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers and helped lead the international campaign for a UN treaty to ban the use of children in armed conflict. Over 110 countries, including the United States have ratified this treaty. After months of consultation from Human Rights Watch, Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) and Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS) have introduced The Child Soldiers Prevention Act. Yesterday, Senator Durbin chaired a Senate hearing on child soldiers, where he used a video produced by HRW (featuring the acclaimed author of A Long Way Gone, Ishmael Beah) to make a compelling case for the bill. Of 10 governments worldwide implicated in the recruitment or use of child soldiers, 9 currently receive US military assistance. If passed, the Act would restrict US military financing, training, and weapons transfers to governments involved in the recruitment or use of child soldiers. Please take action today: Watch the video above to learn more about the Child Soldiers Prevention Act Contact your elected representatives and urge them to lend their support Send this page to friends and family and encourage them to take action With your help we can take the world one step closer to completely stopping the use of child soldiers.

304th ING

 
Southern Baghdad Aug. 1, 2004
Junedis during a search operation south of Baghdad Aug. 1, 2004.
I spent most of 2004 and 2005 as an Army photog in southern Baghdad. A lot of that time (most, in fact) out in the field with the grunts and converted treadheads fighting the growing and incessant insurgency. The first rumblings of sectarian violence started there too.

Some of that time I spent with the 304th Iraqi National Guard Battalion, a sometimes ill-equipped and semi-competent rabble of Iraqis who were there for a variety of reasons. Those reasons were, to me, examples of the stark choices in life that freedom brought to them after April 9, 2003. A small number English and they told me in halting words they they served because they either needed a job or felt like something larger was at stake for Iraq. With unemployment hovering at 50 percent and that growing insurgency, there wasn't any middle ground in their reasons.

Being out there with them was always an adventure. You never really knew what to expect and anything could happen. Often times nothing more than a few slaps. Occassionally something exploded and I was treated to a death blossom.

What I did see, while a little unorganized despite the monumental efforts of the American advisors to train them, was a motivated (at least in the Iraqi sense) groupe of men -- especially the battalion's B & C Companies. I have no idea if the men I photographed are still in the 304th. Many IA units had problems with pay problems, lack of working equipment and motivation, etc etc.

 

Dec. 5, 2004 -- Southern Baghdad
A detained man pleads with an Iraqi junedi from the 304th ING during a search operation in southern Baghdad Dec. 5, 2004.
July 18, 2004 -- Baghdad
A junedi during a search operation in southern Baghdad July 18, 2004.

 

Poll

Which Photo Agency Is Hardest To Deal With? (Please use the comment section to address some of the issues you see.)
Getty
29%
Corbis
7%
Sipa
5%
Blackstar
4%
WireImage
6%
Panos
1%
Agency VU
2%
Lookat Photos
4%
VII
6%
Magnum
11%
Aurora
1%
Gamma
5%
WPN
5%
Zuma Press
8%
Polaris
5%
Total votes: 690
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